So you didn’t get the role – and it just plain sucks.

 

Yeah, it does. It sucks. I can understand the knee-jerk reaction is to wonder what you did wrong, or what you missed – it’s not that.  Keep in mind – if I have two people I absolutely love for a role, and it’s literally the hardest decision ever to choose between them – that still means that one of those two people is getting the role, and one – one isn’t. And it sucks. Even if you came so close to getting it, and it could have been great with you in the role – you’re the one that isn’t getting it.  Please know it breaks my heart too, and just makes me more determined to find something for you.

 

Don’t dwell.  It’s not your fault, as I spent three other posts explaining. Look forward, to the next role, to the next opportunity to build and create.  This wasn’t a “no,” it was a “not this one.” And look at what you did gain. Maybe this character had you exercising a new muscle. Maybe it helped you discover a different facet of yourself. Maybe it just helped you keep fresh. And maybe it was an opportunity to show that casting director what you can do. Maybe your audition expanded the creative team’s mind for that character, and added an element that will make the story better. You don’t know how far your reach goes. So stay positive, and look forward. Be grateful you had the opportunity – you don’t know what will circle back around because of it.

 

Chin up. Not getting the role sucks, it’s one of the shitty facts of being an actor.  But it’s all those times that it doesn’t happen – that’s what makes it so fucking fantastic when it does. Because you know how hard it is to get a role. You know how hard you work, and how close you’ve come – and when you get that role, you’ll be aware of all those others who worked their asses off too, but you were just a bit better, a bit more right.  You know those other actors are amazing, but you’ll also know that particular character – that one’s special. And no one can portray it like you can. And the casting director, the writers, the director, the producers – they’ll see how special it is too, and how much it fits you like a glove. And then you’ll get the chance to show an audience just what you can do, and from there – who knows!

 

I’m amazed by your courage. Knowing this is part of what it means to be an actor – it astounds me that you choose to try again and again.  I appreciate, and fervently admire that you do. I value your strength and your positivity (yes, even you dark and twisted souls, your positivity).  Even if that perfect role never comes – you tried, again and again. Even trying just once is more than most people do in a lifetime.  Every time you try, it’s a leap of passion and faith, and every time that you try – you inspire others to do the same.  To not live in fear, to dare to be great, to attempt the impossible.

 

So thank you.

One Comment

  1. Spot on. And there is nothing “inane” about the lifeline you are throwing out. Many thanks for your honesty and integrity. You provided, easily, the most comfortable room I’ve read in and your enthusiasm for me, as I can’t speak for others, totally diffused any jitters I had built up due to the scope of the project and your priors. I find myself to be one of the actors you spoke about who gets a few of those side-door entries into the auditions because of the position of friends. That being said, I understand that the role has likely been cast before I even step in the room, yet I didn’t feel as if I was treated any different than the actor who has been sought after or one you already had a pin in . For that, I thank you. And I do hold out the hope that you will remember me enough to know that I am here, professional and ready to put in the work, regardless of any political list.

    Creatively yours,
    Christopher

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